Where Is Marijuana Legal?


Opponents say marijuana poses a public health and safety risk, and some are morally against legalization. Proponents, however, argue that it is not as dangerous as alcohol and point to evidence that it has therapeutic benefits, such as stress and pain relief.

Advocates also see it as a moneymaker for states and a necessary social justice initiative. Marijuana laws have disproportionately affected people from minority communities, contributing to mass incarceration. States where the drug is legal have sought to retroactively address the consequences of marijuana prohibition, often including provisions.

Michigan - legalization measure approved November 2018

It is legal for adults over 21 in Michigan to grow, consume and possess marijuana. The law allows individuals to grow up to 12 plants in a household, and to possess up to 2.5 ounces of the drug and 15 grams of concentrated marijuana.

The state's Marijuana Regulatory Agency began accepting applications for retail licenses in late 2019. Michigan now operates licensed retailers for recreational cannabis use, as well as provisioning centers for medical use, according to David Harns, interim communications director for Michigan's Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.

States where recreational marijuana is legal:

Colorado

Washington

Alaska

Oregon

Washington, D.C.

California

Maine

Massachusetts

Nevada

Michigan

Vermont

Guam

Illinois

Arizona

Montana

New Jersey

New York

Virginia

New Mexico

Connecticut

International Cannabis And Hemp Expo Held In San Francisco

Photo: Getty Images North America


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